KPH History

KPH provided reliable service to ships at sea from the early days of radio. This service is what most people think of today when recalling the great radio installations at Bolinas, Point Reyes and Marshall, California. But in fact KPH was the poor cousin to the point-to-point service that operated mainly under the call KET. From the beginning until its last days KPH was always struggling for funding and facilities, often relegated to using transmitters and antennas no longer needed by the point-to-point service. But the KPH maritime service outlasted not only the point-to-point service but the satellite service that replaced it!

These photos show KPH as it developed through the years. There are even some pictures of the point-to-point equipment. But this is mainly the story of KPH. We will begin at the receiving stations and then look at the transmitting station at Bolinas. QRV?

Ok, then let's go...


View all images as a slideshow

KPH Hillcrest 1916

 KPH Hillcrest 1916
KPH Hillcrest 1916

This is the earliest photo we have of KPH.  It's a rare view 1916 of the station at Hillcrest above Daly City, south of San Francisco.  Take careful note of the terrain, the Pacific ocean in the far distance and Lake Merced in the middle distance, than check the Radio Archeology section for a view of the site today.  The mid watch at KPH Hillcrest must have been a lonley job, especially on wind and rain swept nights.

KPH Hillcrest 2008

 KPH Hillcrest 2008
KPH Hillcrest 2008

See the Radio Archeology section of this Web site for details of our search for the location of KPH Hillcrest.  As this photo shows, we found it.  Note the concrete footings on which the building restd and lake Merced and the coast in the background.  MRHS member Mike Johnson stands on the hallowed ground.

KPH Hillcrest 1919

KPH Hillcrest 1919
KPH Hillcrest 1919

The KPH Hillcrest station as it looked in 1919 before the move to Marshall.  The transmitter and receiver were co-located.  The receiver (actually, the tuner), to the left on the operating desk, is a Marconi Type 106 using a crystal detector.  To its right in an outboard audio amplifier using a single tube which can be seen mounted by its leads on the front panel.  Note the large knife switches and the ceiling (operated by pull ropes) and right wall.  Note also the holster nailed to the right leg of the operating table containing a revolver.  In his book "My San Francisco Story" Richard Johnstone talks being an operator at Hillcrest and about the pistol.  It turns out it was used to deal with "our little black and white friends", the skunks who liked to hide under the building.

Marconi Type 106 Tuner

 Marconi Type 106 Tuner
Marconi Type 106 Tuner

This photo of a Marconi Type 106 tuner appears in the 1917 edition of Elmer E. Bucher's book "Practical Wireless Telegraphy".  This Type 106 is slightly different from the one shown at KPH.  This one appears to have two crystal detectors for example.

KPH Marshall

KPH Marshall
KPH Marshall

KPH moved from Hillcrest to the long wave receiving site in Marshall, a rural town north of San Francisco on Tomales Bay.  Marshall was the site of the original Marconi trans-Pacific receiving station established in 1913.  As always, the marine service played the poor cousin to the elite point-to-point service.  Here, two KPH ops occupy a corner for the point-to-point operations building, dressed smartly for their photo opportunity.  They sport Western Electric model 509 headphones while manipulating their bugs and IP-501 tuners with outboard stage of audio amplification.  Note the land line telegraph sounder.  The transmitting station in Bolinas and the receiving station were connected to each other and to the Central Radio Office in San Francisco by a land line telegraph system.  Operators had to be bi-lingual in Morse, knowing both Amercan (land line) and Continental (radio) Morse.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

KPH Mashall

KPH Mashall
KPH Mashall

Here's a later version of the KPH operating position at Marshall, thought be be taken in the 1930s.  The IP 501 receiver has been relegated to a shelf while pride of place is occupied by a home made medium frequency (MF) receiver in front of the operator to the left.  This receiver was said to be very sensitive but not very selective.  To the right is the man himself, Frank Geisel, the most famous manager of KPH.  A welcome addition is the horn speaker, allowing the operators to dispense with their earphones at least occasionally.  The land line sounder remains in prominent view.  Perhaps most striking is the kitchen clock - without silent period markings - as the station time piece.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Point Reyes Receive Site

Point Reyes Receive Site
Point Reyes Receive Site

The Marconi - and later RCA - point-to-point system operated on very low frequencies, in the 15kc to 30kc range.  Once the efficiency of the shortwaves was discovered RCA decided they were commercially viable.  But there was no room at the Marshall receive site for the multiple antennas required.  So RCA dispatched Dr. Harold Beverage to scout the area the area for a new shortwave receiving site to replace Marshall. He selected the mesa on the Point Reyes peninsula where this building was constructed. Known as "RS" on the land line telegraph (Bolinas was "BL"), it was the home of the elete point-to-operators from 1929 until the end of WWII.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Point Reyes Receive Site

Point Reyes Receive Site
Point Reyes Receive Site

Another view of RS shows a visitor's car and a small glimpse of the feed line termination frame on the right side of the building.  Two other termination frames, at the rear and on the right side, were used for the A, B and C antenna fields.  Only the rear termination frame remains today.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Original Service Car 50

Original Service Car 50
Original Service Car 50

RCA used Willys utility wagons for the Radiomarine Service Company which proivided technical support for Radiomarine equipped ships when they were in port.  This photo shows Radiomarine Service Car 50 on a visit to RS.  Coincidentally, MRHS member Richard Dillman owns and drives a Willys utility wagon.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

New Service Car 50

New Service Car 50
New Service Car 50

Richard had his Willys lettered to match the vehicle shown in the historic photo. Here Richard and Tom Horsfall pose in front of the recreated Service Car No. 50 parked in same spot as the one in the original photo. The current Service Car No. 50 is a 4WD version equipped with a PTO winch, making it useful for jaunts into the antenna fields for maintenance.

Post War KPH

Post War KPH
Post War KPH

During WWII KPH, like most coast stations, was closed for the duration.  After the war RCA told Frank Geisel to re-open KPH and start making some "revenue for the company" (which became one of Frank's famous mottos).  But the directive was to re-open the station not at Marshall but at RS, the domain of the elite point-to-point men who were aghast at the idea of the invasion.  As always, KPH got the short end of the stick, being crammed into the former lunch room.  This photo shows early post war KPH with a two position operating room.  The land line telegraph sounder remains.  There's a lot of equipment in this small space.  Note the paper loop on the Creed keying head near the window for the KPH "wheel" with Kleinschmidt punch nearby.  The clocks now sport red segments for the silent period.  Space was so tight that during the Christmas rush they would put a guy out in the hall with a set of earphones and a small table to copy the extra traffic. The antenna wires coming in through the window are RCA balanced lines designed for the purpose. Receivers are a National HRO, RCA AR-8506 and three RCA CR-88As. Auxiliary equipment includes Teletype machines, a Kleinschmidt perferator and a Morse keying head. It must have been a busy place! In 1959 the KPH operating room moved to the rear of the building, where it is today. The space was made available when the point-to-point receivers upstairs were changed from battery sets to AC sets. That change allowed the battery room downstairs to be emptied, making space for KPH. After KPH moved to the rear of the building the lunch room was restored until Ed Brennan's tenure as manager (1977-1981). Then it was moved to its current location at the rear of the building near the CW operating room.  

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

CW Operator

CW Operator
CW Operator

Bill Meloney, one of the members of the "den of thieves", as the KPH operators were called by the point-to-point men, on duty in the early post WWII CW operating room.  A home made board with the RCA logo and a space for the operator's licenses has been added.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

CW Operators

CW Operators
CW Operators

Another view of the early post war receiving positions at KPH in the former lunch room area at the front of the building. The two operators on duty are Harold Zimmer "HZ" (with the suspenders) and Arnold Hansen "AH".

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

CW Operating Position

CW Operating Position
CW Operating Position

First post war CW room at "RS" Point Reyes.  The electric clock with the Silent Period markings is still in service at KSM.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

RS Antenna Field

RS Antenna Field
RS Antenna Field

The antenna field at RS covered many acres with antennas for both the point-to-point and maritime services. We have antenna field diagrams going back to 1937. It can take hours of study before the complex antenna plan begins to become apparent. The point-to-point service used triple diversity with antennas aimed at all points of the Pacific rim as well as at "Radio Central" on Long Island, NY. Each antenna system was reproduced in triplicate in three different areas of the antenna field. Beverage antennas thousands of feet long extended across the entire area. Each antenna was fed with open wire line, many using the complex 4-wire system. All of these terminated at a wooden frame behind the building, tension being maintained by counterweights. Some of this system still exists at RS.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Den of Thieves

Den of Thieves
Den of Thieves

Here it is, the famous "Den of Thieves" in its glory days. This raucus bunch of maritime operators were in fact the best in the business, able to copy the worst fists and the highest speeds on the air. Jack Martini MTO/RO (DM) standing, (left to right) Bill Meloney R/O, (WM), Les Burgher R/O, (LR), Fred Baxter R/O (BX), Joel Medina R/O, (JM) Joel left the station prior to the arrival of John Moore therefore there was no duplication of sines at KPH, but there was a JM at that time at RS a Receiving Tech named John Mundo.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

KPH CW Operating Room

KPH CW Operating Room
KPH CW Operating Room

This is the MF position in the 1960s which was in the corner of the room where position 4 now is.  Note elaborate arrangement for running long punched paper tapes, the creed keying head in the lower right and old style message rack.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Operating Position Close Up

 Operating Position Close Up
Operating Position Close Up

This close up gives a better view of the operating position including the transmitter control panel, antenna patches (top of the rack), a Klein and the tape keying head.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Message Rack Close Up

 Message Rack Close Up
Message Rack Close Up

Note the slot for the "QRM File"!  It looks like some wag has pasted a "Handle with Care" sticker at the bottom of the rack.  Typical radioman humor.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

"Enough!"

"Enough!"

The receive site at "RS" is surrounded by cow pasture.  Thus the operating room has more than its fair share of flies.  Many of the original KPH flyswatters are still in service.  Here's Jack Crawford, (JC) sitting at the old MF position which was located where Position 4 now is. The teletype punching postion and model 14 reperf was just to Sid's left.  

"Sid" in CW Operating Room

"Sid" in CW Operating Room

Note the land line sounder beneath the clock.  The panel to the left under the bullet speaker is the control for the scanner, associated with a point-to-point receiver upstairs.

Classic 60s Vintage Operating Position

Classic 60s Vintage Operating Position
Classic 60s Vintage Operating Position

Note the command set to upper left.

CW Operating Position

CW Operating Position
CW Operating Position

Albano Leal (AL) Brazilian native, ex PPR. A character of the nth degree. Often spent time in FGs office for the famous "fatherly chat".  Note the Dymo label on his earphones.  Everyone had their own set of "cans" and key.

Les Burger

Les Burger
Les Burger

Les Burger "LR". Note the headphones worn well forward in true radioman fashion. The small white square on the phones is a Dymo label with his sine, "LR", designating this headset as his. Operators also brought their own keys. We have a good view of Les' Vibroplex in this photo. Note the cable clamp used as a weight! The cord and wedge connects his key to the straight key. To Les' left can be seen the Collins 51J-4 receiver and above it a Drake receiver, probably a 2-B. Even though a local side tone was supplied at each position most operators preferred listening to their own signal off the air. The Drake was used for this purpose.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Fred Baxter

Fred Baxter
Fred Baxter

Fred Baxter "BX" at the mill at operating position 2. To his left is the Collins 51J-4 main receiver. The ship calling bands were marked with masking tape just below the main frequency readout. These can barely be seen in the photo. The receivers above the 51J-4 and to Fred's right are RCA CR-88As. The switch panel with the pilot lights in the rack behind the mill was used to select the various transmitters and what would be broadcast on each (the KPH "wheel", weather, traffic list or the local key). The panel at the bottom with the speakers allowed the operator to select the receiver he wanted to listen to and also plug in his earphones. This same panel is in use today at operating position 1 at the revived KPH.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Operating Position 2

Operating Position 2
Operating Position 2

A view of operating position 2 in 1972 showing the beginning of the transition from tube to solid state primary receivers. The Collins 51J-4 remains but now in the secondary position in the right hand rack. A new National HRO-500 now occupies the primary receiver position to the left. On one HRO-500 still at the station from this era the serrated main tuning knob has been worn absolutely smooth from hours of manual band scanning. Changes have taken place in the center rack as well. New illuminated pushbuttons below the message slots have been installed for antenna selection via a multicoupler and remote relay arrangement. The transmitter selector panel remains but the speaker panel is gone.

Den of Thieves, 1979

Den of Thieves, 1979
Den of Thieves, 1979

Here's the "Den of Thieves" as it looked in 1979. The operators are, clockwise from the left, Denice Stoops "DA", the first female operator at KPH, Warren Reese "TR", station technician Steve Elliott "SE", Steve Bowers "SB", marine telex operator, standing by the traffic rack, Ed Brennan "EB", station manager, Jack Martini "DM", and William "Sugar Willie" Erikson "WE". Sitting with his hand on the 51J-4 is station maintenance man Arthur Shelton "AS", (pretending to be an operator to impress his friends, according to "DM"!), then John Moore "JM", marine telex operator, Bill Meloney "WM" and Ray Smith "RC", senior Morse operator and the person who sent the last message from KPH on the day it closed. Jack Martini, Warren Reese, Denice Stoops and Ray Smith are honored members of the Maritime Radio Historical Society. When we recently put the station back on the air Denice took her place at operating position 1. She summed it up nicely for all of us when she remarked, "Who says you can't go home again?"

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Pt to Pt Ops

Pt to Pt Ops
Pt to Pt Ops

While the members of the "Den of Thieves" hollered and yelled and stole ships from each other in the ground floor CW operating room the elite operators of the point-to-point service played it cool in the receiving room upstairs. Here we see Steve Bowers,  (SB) on the left.  To the right is Joy E. Kinney, point to point technician, ex-KPH marine Telex operator, ex Radio Telephone Operator at RMCA WGK St.Louis, (JK). SB talking to JK at the point to point receiving station operations room at Point Reyes RS (the wire line designation for the station) on the second floor. JK and WGK's manager, Ed Fleming, transferred to RS when RCA closed WGK. Ed took the single RS tech  opening, and Joy Kinney took an open KPH telex operator position. He later transferred to RS as a Receiving Tech when a position opened. When RS closed, Joy transferred to Central Telegraph Office in San Francisco as an Operating Tech. He still lives in Inverness Park and is well into his 80s.

Frank Geisel

Frank Geisel
Frank Geisel

Here he is, the man himself, "Mr. KPH ", Frank Geisel, standing before a map showing the globe-girdling RCA network of point-to-point and maritime stations. The map still exists at the RCA transmitting building in Bolinas. By all accounts Frank was a hard driving perfectionist who wanted things done the Geisel way. Errant operators would be called into his office for personal chat if they failed to adhere to that policy. But the men who served at KPH when he was manager remember him with reverence and great affection as a real radioman who was dedicated to the success of station. One of Frank's favorite sayings was "Beauuutiful!" when something particularly pleased him. He can be heard using that exact phrase on the audio tape of his last day as manager of KPH. Years later Jack Martini, one of Frank's "pillars of strength" along with Ray Smith, used that same phrase when he heard KPH come back on the air after it had been abandoned and left for dead. Frank would have agreed. It was indeed "Beauuutiful!"

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Frank's Ticket

 Frank's Ticket
Frank's Ticket

Frank Geisel's 1st Class Radiotelegraph license from 1925.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Riggers

Riggers
Riggers

Here is a group of brave men, the riggers who worked on the Marconi towers at BL in the days of the Alexanderson alternator. The man at the far right is a young Jimmy Bourne. Jimmy went on to become chief rigger at KPH and retired July 1, 1976. For a rememberance of Jimmy Bourne please visit the Incredible Radio Tales section. The bases of these towers still exist at BL. Check out the photos in the KPH Today section for a picture of one of the tower bases at BL as it appears today. One Alexanderson alternator still remains in working condition in Sweden, the home country of the great inventor. Station SAQ at Grimeton has been preserved as a museum. The station's alternator is operated and put on the air for special occasions.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Bolinas Site

Bolinas Site
Bolinas Site

Entry to "BL" the point-to-point and KPH transmitter site in Bolinas established by the American Marconi Company in 1913 as seen in 1949.  Some of the original Marconi towers can be seen along with Building 1 in the distance and Building 2 to the left.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Building 2, Bolinas

Building 2, Bolinas
Building 2, Bolinas

This view of Building 2, looking towards the Pacific Ocean, shows the building in its original form before the addition of Building 2A. Two of the famous Marconi 300ft. cylindrical pressed steel masts may be seen along with the H frames carrying the antenna feed lines. Building 1 is just out of view at the top right of the photo.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

Marconi mast

Marconi mast
Marconi mast

This photo gives a better view of one of the Marconi masts. Eleven of these supported the multiple tuned Alexanderson antenna. The bases of these masts and their guy anchors still exist.

Building 42, Bolinas

Building 42, Bolinas
Building 42, Bolinas

Building 42, the tuning house for the 300ft. base insulated tower used on 500 and 426kc/s. Transmitter BL-10 in Building 1 was in service at this time, feeding the tuning house via a 3-wire open wire line

Rigger on Tower

Rigger on Tower
Rigger on Tower

Rigger Jim Stoops bravely climbing the 300ft. tower (with BL-10 turned off, one hopes!). This tower was eventually replaced when it developed a kink and became so deteriorated that the painters refused to climb it. 

Building 1 from the Tower

Building 1 from the Tower
Building 1 from the Tower

A view of Building 1 taken from atop the 300ft. tower by Jim Stoops. The poles carrying the 3-wire feed line to Building 42 may barely be seen. This view shows how close Building 1 is to the cliff face which is continually advancing.

Bolinas Supervisor Frank Spicer speculatively eyes the 300ft base insulated MF antenna at Bolinas. Perhaps the slight kink in the antenna is the cause of his concern.  We have the video made by a tower inspector who examined this antenna.  It was in such poor shape he refused to climb more that 1/3 of the way up.  This antenna was demolished and replaced with the Marconi T antenna we use today, suggested by Warren "TR" Reese.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

BC-339

BC-339
BC-339

Frank Spicer, Technical Supervisor at Bolinas, checking transmitters in Building 1 at Bolinas. They are military BC-339 sets with their attendant BC-340 power amplifiers.  MF transmitter BL-10 occupied the same gallery of the building.

Courtesy of Point Reyes National Seashore Museum

RCA "H" Set

RCA
RCA "H" Set

The "H" sets are the most complex transmitters still at the site.  This one is shown in service (note the red tally light) in Building 2A at an unknown date.  The "H" sets were used primarily in point-to-point service.  We plan to restore at least "H" set to service.

BL-11

BL-11
BL-11

Ivan Nielsen, transmitter tech, with backup MF transmitter BL-11 shown in the MF tuning house, Building 42.  For the saga of BL-11 please see the Radio Archeology section.

Building 2A, Bolinas

Building 2A, Bolinas
Building 2A, Bolinas

This is Building 2A which was added to the west end of Building 2 in 1959. This is the building that contains the remaining KPH transmitters today. Further views of the interior and exterior of Building 2A may be seen in the "KPH Today" section.

Bill Meloney at the MF/HF operating position.  We have almost all we need to re-create this position including the Marconi Atalanta receiver shown in the photo.

Bill Meloney, with his typically dry sense of humor, holding up a sign saying that the traffic list is about to be sent - explaining why he was not busy working ships when the photo was taken!  The photo is unique in that is shows the last of the Collins tube receivers, the 51S-1, to the right and the Watking Johnson WJ-8518 to the left. The WJs, with very early serial numbers, are still in service.

Bill Meloney (WM) at the entrance to the station. The flag dates this pic as 1977 during the strike/lockout as well as the RCA signage which completely omits that there is a HF Marine Radio Station located therein. That was RCA's attitude when RCA Americom co-located their operation with KPH at Pt.Reyes, KPH was a non-entity.

Rhio Blair (RH) poses for a photo at position 5. Note the 51S1 on the right, the last of the Collins tube type receivers.

Les Burger, (LR) checking a TTY tape for errors prior to sending it through the Fredricks CW tape converte.

Morse operator Ray Smith sitting happily at his operating position. To the left is a Collins 51J-4 receiver. Note the masking tape marks on the slide rule dial to allow quick setting to ship calling and working frequencies. The Drake 2B above was used for a keying monitor. To the right is a National HRO-500, the first solid state receiver to be used at KPH.

Gary Olsen (OLE) working ships at the MF position.  One of the first solid state receiver, a National HRO-500, is present.  But Gary is still using a mill and he's wearing ancient Western Electric model 509 earphones, the same model you can see KPH operators wearing in the photo near the beginning of this sequence showing them in action when the receive site was in Marshall.

Bruce Chapman (BC) working ships at a HF cw position.

George Wilkinson (GW) (ex-KFS), and Jack Martini (DM), working in the Telex room during the pre-SITOR days.  

After the demise of the HF point to point service the receive room upstairs was filled with gear for the satellite earth station that replaced it.  Here's the installation of one of the RCA Americom International Business Service (IBS) dishes. It looks like the 13 meter dish that was on the west side of the station.  

Jack Martini (DM) (foreground), Rhio Blair, CW operator, (RH) posing outside the station. The cable roll was a remnant of the replacement control cable that replaced the lead cable which ran underground from the station building to Sir Francis Drake Blvd.  The cable connected the station to the transmitter site in Bolinas and to the Central Radio Office in San Francisco.  Cable connections between the facilities began in 1913 when the American Marconi Company established the transmit and receive stations in Marin county.  MRHS member Richard Dillman remembers seeing the cable beside the roads and in operation in the early 1970s.  The cable links were eventually replaced by high speed T1 digital circuits.

Bill Gibbons (WF) Copying a QTC on HF.

Art Shelton, station maintenance man (AS) stands next to Bob Phelan, marine Telex operator (RP) in front of the cw room control panel.  The CW panel is very much the same today with the tone sets in the bottom half of the rack still being used to key the transmitters in Bolinas.  But there is something very subtle and very funny in this photo, a radioman's inside joke.  Note the green box on the wall near the space saver telephone handset.  It is a call box used to summon a messenger to pick up a radiogram.  All the communications companies had them and they were installed in shipping companies, ship chandlers, etc.  RCA had its version too but the one in the photo is a Mackay call box!  So the joke is that here at the major RCA station they summoned a Mackay messenger to handle their messages!  In a final twist, when we first saw this photo MRHS member Richard Dillman recalled that he had a Mackay call box in a collection, donated by Bill Ruck of the Transmitter Department.  So there is now a Mackay call box on the wall just where the one in this photo once was.  The space saver phone has been reinstalled as well, using the same mounting holes used by the original.

Danny Lucchesi, marine Telex operator, (DL) standing in the Telex room. In the background are the station landline Telex machines. At that time we had three circuits, 278333 (primary), 278332, and 278300 (secondaries) If one Telex was occupied, the caller was automatically switched to one of the other two.

A temporary diesel generator being installed following the failure (run away) of the station emergency power diesel. The event occured during the Norm Santos (NS) station manager term, 1981-84.

Bill Meloney (WM) sitting at the KPH/MF position, his normal operating position.  There's a lot to see in this photo.  On the left is a Marconi Atalanta receiver used for MF.  This receiver has been recovered and returned to the KPH receive site.  Above the Atalanta is a wind up eight day radio room clock with markings for the silent period and the auto alarm signal.  This clock has been lost but a twin is now mounted at the current KPH/KSM MF operating position.  The can to the right of the clock is still in use at the current Position 1, holding grease pencils and pens (the grease pencil shown is still in service).  Atop the center rack we can see the storage cabinet for individual keys.  This cabinet has been recovered and is currently in use.  Below the slots for paperwork the antenna switching panel can be seen with white pushbuttons, one set of buttons for each receiver.  This panel, now painted blue, is still in service.  Below the antenna switching panel is the transmitter control panel allowing selection of individual transmitters for hand keying, the wheel or messages like the traffic list or weather.  Below that is the audio patch panel.  This and the transmitter control panel are now lost.  Below is the speaker panel which is still in service.  The rack to the right is topped by a RCA CRM-R6A receiver.  Below that is the LF-10 converter for the HRO-500 receiver behind Bill.  We don't have the LF-10 but we do have the HRO-500.

Bill Meloney (WM) copying a message at which looks like a HF position instead of MF where he usually sat.

Denice Stoops, CW operator (DA) making a phone call on one of the phones in the CW operations room. This photo was taken early in DA's KPH career which dates this photo in the late 1970s, after Denice moved over to KPH from being a CW operator at NMC, the Coast Guard station next door. The phone shown in this photo has been re-installed and restored to working condition at Position 1 in the current CW operations room.

Jack Martini writes: Those two lovely kids are RC's (Ray Smith's) son Christopher and daughter Sarah at one of our Xmas parties. They are both now in their forties which fixes the date in the late 70s.

Dick Flint, CW operator (RF), Jack Martini, marine Telex operator and CW operator, Steve Bowers, marine Telex operator, (SB) in the Telex ops room in the late 70s or early 80s. Note the SITOR unit STB75 and ITT RX 3020 which dates the photo. There is a second SITOR unit in the photo that can't be seen well enough to identify.

Steve Heimburger, CW operator (SS) in the CW operations room in the 70s

Bill Meloney, (WM) at the MF position in the 1960s. Note the call sign book is on top of the receiver. We believe that was Frank Geisel's sacred scroll book which was only to be touched by WM, and no others unless specifically asked by the MAN.

Left to right: Unidentified woman, Dick Flint, CW operator (RF), Bruce Chapman, CW operator (BC). On the back wall is the 1977 lockout/strike flag which was flown at the end of the station entrance driveway during picket duty.

Steve Bowers, (SB), foreground, and Jack Martini (DM), at work in the SITOR/Telex room next to the CW room.

Standing in the temporary CW operations area, Gary Olsen and Phil Diehl, (PD) contemplate a Polaroid photo.

Gary Olsen, CW operator, (OLE), standing behind the traffic rack. This is a unique photo of the KPH temporary CW operation area setup in Frank Geisel's old office during a station renovation project in Ed Brennan's (EB) managerial tenure. Three HF and one MF position were constructed on tables. The MF position located on the far left.

Denice Stoops, CW operator (DA)  at the 500 position, Lena Smith (Ray Smith's wife) standing next to Steve Bowers, marine Telex operator, (SB). This photo taken at one of KPH's Christmas parties.

Jack Martini, CW operator and marine Telex operator (later KPH manager),(DM) left, John Moore, marine Telex operator, (JM), right.

Ray Smith, CW operator, (RC) in foreground, Bill Gibbons, CW operator (WF) in background.

Phil Diehl, CW operator, (PD) in foreground, Bill Gibbons, CW operator, (WF), in background.

Left to right: Bill Gibbons, CW operator (WF), Bruce Chapman, CW operator, (BC), Gloria Ruppert, Station Secretary, (GR), Bill Meloney, CW operator, (WM), Jack Martini, CW operator (DM), Ray Smith, CW operator, (RC), Charlie Derapalian, Station Manager 1984-86, (CD)

Left to right: Bill Gibbons, CW operator, Danny Lucchesi, marine Telex opetator, Bruce Chapman, CW operator, Warren Reese, CW operator and transmitter technician. Of partucular note is what can be seen in the background of this photo.  It shows the last gasp of the HF point to point service.  As the upstairs receiver room was being prepared to become a satellite Earth station the receiver for the last circuit, to Tahiti, was installed downstairs.  This space was later occupied by the station computer network.

Steve Bowers, marine Telex operator, at one of the two punching positions in the wire room next to the CW room.  Both positions used Model 28 reperferators.

Warren "Tracy" Reese on duty at Position 3 in the "new" KPH operating area, still using the mill.  Quite appropriately, he's got a copy of the Sparks Journal open and ready for reading between calls.

Warren "Tracy" Reese at the key.

Radiogram via KPH ca 1963.